On Idioms

“Calm down, you’re making a mountain out of a molehill.”

Idioms are quirky. They can give you insight as to how a culture views the world and understands imagery.

Making a mountain out of a molehill means to be making a big deal about something small.
Spanish’s equivlent would be “Ahogarse en un vaso de agua” – which translated litterally would mean “to be drowning in a glass of water.”

The literal translations: “para hacer una montaña de un grano de arena” and “to be drowning in a glass of water” bear only slight resemblence to the meaning “to make a big deal about something small” but they have no actual literal meaning in the other language. That’s why there’s idiom. So whether you’re making a mountain out of a molehill or Ahogarse en un vaso de agua – the idiom of what you mean is understood by those who speak the same language.

While we do get some of our idioms from the Bible, such as “to have the patience of Job”, what we might not as easily understand are the idioms that Jesus would have used in his everyday speech.

http://biblicalstudies.org.uk/article_idioms.html

This a great page that shows you not only what is said, but how – and once you understand that, you realize that there is a rich use of language in every way – the people in the Bible talk a lot like we do, just in another language. Once you realize that, you can find all sorts of things that were lost in translation, that went without being said, and had deeper, more profound meanings that a literal reading would allow for.

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...Anyway, that's just how I feel about it ... What do you think?

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